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Developments to watch: Part two

  • Property
  • April 12, 2018
  • Caitlin Salter
Developments to watch: Part two

As part of our series exploring new property developments across New Zealand, we look at two retail expansions popping up in Tauranga.
 

Tauranga

Bayfair Shopping Centre

At the heart of New Zealand’s growth is Tauranga and plans to secure the city’s place in the future are heating up in 2018. Construction of the $115m expansion of Bayfair Shopping Centre started in December 2017, updating the centre with a modern offering.

The development will have an additional 50 specialty stores, 150 in total upon completion, offering a strong fashion mix previously unseen in the region. An alfresco dining precinct is also a new feature, which developers hope will drive week-long evening trade. The centre’s overall footprint is expected to expand by 9,000sqm to a total of 42,000sqm and an additional 200 parking spaces will be added.

United Cinemas, an Australian-owned chain of cinemas, will take its place as the Bay of Plenty’s largest cinema complex, boasting seven screens and more than 13,000 seats. Bayfair is the company’s first complex on this side of the ditch.

Bayfair Shopping Centre manager Steve Ellingford says the development is intended to help future-proof shopping in the Bay of Plenty.

“Tauranga is transitioning into a city and people here want to have access to the type of shopping you can get in big cities like Auckland,” he says.

The Auckland-based architects behind the development, Woodhams/Meikle/Zhan, have significant retail experience, notably with Westfield Manukau and Westfield Riccarton.

Bayfair has been the home of New Zealand’s last Woolworths, as it was rebranded to the Australian Woolworths logo rather than converting to a Countdown. The new development will merge the two supermarkets into a large, brand-new Countdown.

Ellingford says some of the most exciting changes to Bayfair will be with its new, state-of-the-art amenities, such as a quiet room designed for people with sensory processing disorders such as autism and a redesigned parents’ room.

The initial stage of the redevelopment is set to open pre-Christmas 2018, and the final stage (including the cinema) is expected to open in 2019.

Tauranga Crossing

Also catering to Tauranga’s growing needs is the Tauranga Crossing stage two development, which started construction in November 2017. Located in Tauriko, the city’s western growth corridor, the initial stage of Tauranga Crossing, which opened in late 2016, includes Pak’n Save, The Warehouse, Noel Leeming and Warehouse Stationery.

The second stage of development will partially open with 20 new stores in October 2018. It is due for completion in April 2019, with a cinema and entertainment precinct as well as a yet-to-be-announced international fashion retailer.

The ‘all-weather’ enclosed shopping centre is set to include 15 restaurants and food outlets, as well as fashion and general merchandise stores. Stage two will add 19,000sqm of trading space to the shopping centre. At the centre of the second half of stage two is the six-screen Event Cinema Complex.

Tauranga Crossing chief executive Steve Lewis says the team of retail specialists, lead by architects Warren and Mahoney, is working to create a future-focused shopping experience in the region.

“We’re pleased to be working with them to bring the next generation of retail in Tauranga. We want it to be a vibrant hub for the community.”

The future stage three, another enclosed shopping centre expansion, will add a further approximate 12,000sqm of retail space making it the largest retail choice in the region with a total of 73,000sqm.

Key features include the cinema, and food precinct with an alfresco dining terrace overlooking a north-facing garden.

“Our view is it’s a great experience, and we want it to be unique. It’s an experience that’s contemporary and relaxing. But we know it does rain in New Zealand and the last thing our customers want is to run through the rain to go shopping - so there will be a lot of things to do inside the enclosed shopping centre as well,” Lewis says.

This story originally appeared in NZ Retail magazine issue 754 February/March 2018

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