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Eight retail design tips that will help you boost sales

  • Opinion
  • March 29, 2016
  • Francesca Nicasio
Eight retail design tips that will help you boost sales

1. Set your layout based on the flow of traffic in-store

You want people to see your best and most enticing products or displays first, so you’ll need to know where they go or turn to when they enter your shop. Do they tend to move to the left or right? Where do their eyes go? These are just some of the questions you should ask when merchandising your store.

Fortunately, research offers some insights into retail traffic patterns. Studies have shown that that the flow of traffic in-store may actually be influenced by vehicular patterns on the road. In the book Inside the Mind of the Shopper by Herb Sorensen, he notes:

"The pattern of movement in the supermarket is counterclockwise in the United States, but PathTracker studies in the UK, Australia, and Japan show a much greater tendency for shoppers to move in a clockwise pattern there… traffic patterns in the store may also be affected by vehicle traffic patterns outside. In these small studies, we noted that in countries with right-hand driving, where traffic circles move in a clockwise pattern, shoppers in stores may be more comfortable moving the same direction."

With this information in mind, it may behoove you to lead customers to the right if you’re in the United States or in a country that enforces right-hand traffic. But if you’re in the UK, Australia or New Zealand, it may be best to arrange your store to support people moving in a clockwise direction.

That said, while research certainly offers some insights into in-store traffic, you shouldn’t base all your merchandising decisions on external studies alone. Be sure to make your own observations to figure out the traffic patterns of your own customers.

Use foot traffic tools to analyse how customers move about in your store, or just be more observant and pay attention to where shoppers go and the things they look at when they come in.

2. Don’t put merchandise in the decompression zone

Avoid putting too many products or signs near your entrance (aka: the “decompression zone”). Shoppers in this part of the store likely still adjusting to the new environment, so they tend to miss any items or fixtures in this area.

As Paco Underhill, author of Why We Buy: The Science of Shoppingtold Entrepreneur, “By the time the person is starting to engage with the physical environment, some of the stuff you’ve put by the door is blown past.”

According to him, it’s best to display just a small number of items in this area, and make sure that the flooring and lighting contrasts the outside environment. And if you have shopping carts or baskets in the store, consider placing them at the end of the decompression zone.

3. Use your checkout counter to display impulse buy items

Did you know that 27 percent of shoppers make an additional purchase at the checkout counter? Moreover, the space beside your POS system takes up about only one percent of your store space, but could account for seven percent of annual sales.

Clearly, if you aren’t leveraging your checkout space, you’re leaving a lot of money on the table. So encourage those impulse purchases by setting up displays on your checkout counter.

They don’t have to big or fancy; as we mentioned in our previous post, the best impulse buys are easy to grasp–both physically and mentally. They should be simple and inexpensive enough that you won’t have to do any explaining to the shopper.

Have a look at what Bath & Body Works is doing. To encourage customers to purchase their bath foam, they’ve displayed the items on the checkout counter and even threw in a limited-time offer to sweeten the deal.  

4. Add breaks or speed bumps.

Having the same fixtures or aisles in your store could result in shoppers skipping over your merchandise.

Brian Dyches, chief experience officer at Ikonic Tonic told Entrepreneur that upon studying shopping patterns, they found that “up to 20 percent of the store’s merchandise is skipped over” because of long, uninterrupted aisles. To address this, Dyches recommends that retailers create visual breaks in the middle of long aisles. These breaks can come in the form of signs or displays.

We can see a lot of supermarkets putting this tactic into action. Since these types of stores have a lot of aisles, supermarkets often place large, attention-grabbing displays at end of their aisles invigorate their store layouts.

Melissa Gonzalez, brand activation & pop-up architect at The Lionesque Group echoes this advice and says that setting up “speed bumps” in-store is a good way to keep shoppers intrigued. These bumps can be “well merchandised outfits, deeper information about key product offerings, an interactive element such as touch screens or augmented reality like Perch Interactive.

5. Create a focal point in all your displays

While it’s tempting to try to bring attention to anything and everything in your store, tried-and-tested design principles tell us that having just one focal point (preferably at eye level) is far more effective in drawing people in.

So whether you’re arranging your latest window display or setting up a new fixture in the middle of your store, be sure to design it with one focal point in mind. Pick one thing that you want to highlight, position it at eye level, then strategically position other items and lights to bring attention to it.

In doing so, your displays will have greater chances of catching the attention of shoppers. And once you have them hooked, they’ll naturally check out the other products around the focal point.

22-Mar-2016-Image3

Check out this display at Elevator, an accessories and jewellery store in Toronto. You can see they put the focal point principle to good use by choosing to highlight just one item and laying out the rest beneath it.

6. Don’t overstuff the space  

Have enough open space in your store so people can really appreciate your products, and move around without bumping into merchandise or other shoppers. Doing so will benefit you in two ways:

It'll prevent the "butt-brush" effect

In his book Why We Buy, Paco Underhill talks about the butt-brush effect, a phenomenon wherein shoppers would abandon a display or product they were looking at when they were bumped once or twice from behind.

He wrote:

While reviewing the tape to study how shoppers negotiated the doorway during busy times, we began to notice something weird about the tie rack. Shoppers would approach it, stop and shop until they were bumped once or twice by people heading into or out of the store. After a few such jostles, most of the shoppers would move out of the way, abandoning their search for neckwear. We watched this over and over until it seemed clear that shoppers — women especially, though it was also true of men to a lesser extent — don’t like being brushed or touched from behind. They’ll even move away from merchandise they’re interested in to avoid it.

If you have spaces in your store that subject shoppers to the butt-brush effect, you could be losing customers and sales. Take a look around and free up any tight spots that could be making people uncomfortable.

It keeps your store light and airy

In addition to letting people have their personal space, having a roomy store allows customers to better appreciate your merchandise. It makes them feel like a store is thoughtfully curated.

As Niko Downie, owner of Elevator said, “We make everything feel very well curated. Rather than just packing merchandise in and shoving as much as we can into one shelf, we try to make every single part of the store look very well-thought out, very clean, very neat, and not too overcrowded. And that really compliments the way we merchandise and showcase our products because it keep things light and airy. We could throw in really beautiful and stylized pieces like our lighting, but it doesn’t overwhelm the space.”

7. Use signs wisely

Attractive, well-positioned signs will not only catch people’s attention, they can add value your displays and the shopping experience overall. In addition to setting up eye-catching signs to entice people to check out your new arrivals or promotions, find ways to use signage to inform and educate.

Take for example, Sports Authority. The sporting goods retailer has signage beside some of its merchandise to highlight the best uses for its products. These signs not only compliment their fixtures and designs, they also help people make the right purchase decisions.

8. Update your displays regularly

Design and appearance aren’t the only factors that contribute to success of your retail displays. How often you update them also matters. Displays get stale pretty quickly in retail, so change them up regularly.

Retail expert Bob Phibbs recommends that you change them monthly. “Holidays and seasons only last so long, and promotional goods have a short shelf life. Feature new arrivals first,” he adds.

​ ​

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