HomeNEWSArtworks from Te Papa now available on Samsung’s Frame TV

Artworks from Te Papa now available on Samsung’s Frame TV

Digital versions of 13 artworks held in Wellington museum Te Papa’s collection are now available for display on the second generation of Samsung’s Frame TVs. Frame TVs are intended to blend into living environments by resembling a piece of framed artwork when not in use.

Digital versions of 13 artworks held in Wellington museum Te Papa’s collection are now available for display on the second generation of Samsung’s Frame TVs. Frame TVs are intended to blend into living environments by resembling a piece of framed artwork when not in use.

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Consumers receive access to the Samsung Collection of 100 art pieces upon purchase of a Frame TV, but can buy more from Samsung’s Art Store via a monthly paid subscription or a one-off purchase fee per artwork.
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The 13 works released by Te Papa into the Art Store include a painting of Kororareka Beach in the Bay of Islands by Thomas Gardiner (1840), a watercolour of a huia by Johannes Keulemans (1900), and a piece depicting Aoraki/Mt Cook by Charles Barraud (1884).

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Macro photography of two butterfly specimens dating back to 1773 and 1839 has also been included.
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Te Papa’s chief executive Geraint Martin says The Frame would allow users to bring New Zealand art into their everyday.

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“Te Papa is always looking for new ways to share our collections. This is a great way for people to have artworks from New Zealand’s national art collection on display in their own home,” says Martin. 

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The works will join over 750 masterpieces from esteemed museums and galleries including the likes of Saatchi (London), Albertina (Austria) and Lumas (Berlin). 

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Jens Anders, director of Samsung New Zealand’s Consumer Electronics division, says it was time for Aotearoa to make its mark on the Art Store. 

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“Kiwis have truly embraced the Art Store, with New Zealand being one of the top five countries globally when it comes to Frame TV owners activating their subscription. With consumers clearly appreciating the artistic merits of the pieces in their homes, the next natural step was to put some of our New Zealand works on the platform,” says Anders. 
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