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HomeNEWSThe Independent Collective lets ecommerce retailers share a shop

The Independent Collective lets ecommerce retailers share a shop

Eight independent ecommerce retailers from around New Zealand have got the chance to scoop up some Newmarket foot traffic by clubbing together in a pop-up shop.

Eight independent ecommerce retailers from around New Zealand have got the chance to scoop up some Newmarket foot traffic by clubbing together in a pop-up shop.

The Independent Collective founder John Stannard, who set up the venture with his wife Candice, is clear that the pop-up will have benefits beyond walk-ins and on-the-spot sales for its participants. He sees it as primarily a promotional tool.

“These people already have online shops. We’re a marketing avenue for them to do physical marketing.”

The eight retailers are a diverse mix from Napier, Christchurch and Auckland. The current retailer list is: Two Lippy Ladies, Charlotte S Skincare, Duffle & Co, Made in Mexico, Koza Towels, Popping Candy Shoes, 19 Black & Lucis Art. . The Independent Collective is at 160 Broadway in Newmarket, running from December 1 to January 7, 2018.

The Stannards run skincare company Charlotte S online, and came up with the idea for a collective pop-up after looking for tangible, experiential marketing opportunities at a small business level.

Stannard says the six-week pop-up store will raise the retailers’ profile among customers who browse, regardless of whether or not they buy in-store.

“These brands will be around hopefully for years, and the pop-up will only be there for six weeks. They can’t run a business on pop-up sales.”

The Stannards have found that once a customer has bought one of their products, those shoppers are much more confident to re-order. They believe the same will be true of shoppers who inspect products in person at The Independent Collective.

“Once you know what you’re getting, it’s much easier to buy online.”

Having a physical store offers customers the chance to check out items they may have admired online but been reluctant to commit to, Stannard says. In person, they’ll be able to touch and feel fabrics, try on clothing to check the fit, and inspect items for quality.

Stannard says a physical store also gives customers confidence in the retail company itself: “If you see something, you get some faith in the permanence of the brand.”

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