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HomeNEWS#TFWGucci: What does it all meme?

#TFWGucci: What does it all meme?

Gucci has altered its latest campaign to directly target millennials but instead of lowering their prices or make items more accessible they’ve decided the use of eccentric memes is, oddly enough, the way to go. 

I know what you’re thinking, FINALLY a company that just gets me. Now I can justify spending US$870 on a watch because it associated itself with my love of all things meme.

The company launched their memeketing (meme + marketing, clever, right?) #TFWGucci campaign to a fair amount of viral comments, most in their favor. But of all of the brands in the world, did Gucci really have to tap into internet youth culture to sell US$870 watches?

Now don’t get me wrong I’m a sucker for a good meme, they’re hilarious and just oh-so relatable, but as companies start to capitalize and cash in I can’t help but feel like they’re exploiting any craze they can get their hands on. Do I want the watch? Obviously. Is it because of their use of memes? Yes most likely. 

Not all memeketing is bad. A few are actually great, for example Denny’s zoom in social media post, but most make me think that when a #TFWGucci meme goes live, evil Kermit or croc-humping turtle dies. 

Far be it from me to question Gucci. The company is usually on a whole other level than most of us can understand.

The trickle-down effect is bound to happen in the fashion and beauty marketing world and although the posts stayed true to the art collective’s internet aesthetic, the amount of Gucci branding screams odd. Yes, this is too Gucci — even for us Gucci stans. 

When big businesses try to attract younger customers (we see you, Gen Z) in order to make a profit, it comes off as cringe-worthy, awkward and, to be honest, a lot less fun. 

Someone needs to tell Gucci that if you must explain what a ‘starter pack’ is then you’re missing your key demographic. Or at least missing the demographic that can actually afford a Gucci watch.

Since the appointment of Alessandro Michele as Gucci’s new creative director the brand has taken a younger more relaxed angle that also includes gender fluid clothing in its latest collections.

Since Michele started his collections now account for about 70 percent of sales.

Since May 2016 Gucci is now worth just over US$12 billion

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