Close
 

Staff speak: My average day as an OCD retail assistant

  • Opinion
  • August 28, 2017
  • Anonymous
Staff speak: My average day as an OCD retail assistant

In this new opinion column, Kiwi retail staff anonymously share their real-life experiences from the shop floor, behind the counter and beyond. This time, we hear from a retail assistant coping with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

I suffer from diagnosed obsessive-compulsive disorder, and working in retail is somehow the best and worst thing for that.

Working at Ruby on Teed St in Newmarket starts out the same each day. I get in at exactly 8.25am, I spend exactly 10 minutes turning on the lights and checking the notes from the day before.

At 8.35am, I straighten the racks. Each coat hanger must be around one and a half inches apart; for the coat section, two inches.

At 8.45am, I go to take back and take stock of the clothes we have, making a mental map of where everything is.

At 8.55am, I start opening the doors, ready for the first customer of the day.

Working with customers is always interesting, watching their blatant disregard of how far apart the coat hangers are, moving things about and putting them back somewhere else like I won't notice. I do, we all do.

Customers come up and ask if we have a certain size. Although I say I'll check out the back, I know for certain we do as I saw it earlier. Even if I know we don't have it, you always must go out and check. Because even though I work here 40 hours a week and we handle every single piece of clothing that comes in and out, customers still won't believe me unless they see me physically go and triple-check the back.

12pm is my favourite time of day - lunch. People try to ask for help when I'm leaving and I just walk on by. For the next half hour, I don't know you, I don't work here, leave me alone.

Within the next 30 minutes, I'm always apprehensive as to what I'm going to return to. Fire? Angry mob? A lion? Who knows. In retail, you never let your guard down.

The next four hours at work tend to roll on by the same each day. I separate the coat hangers another eight to nine times. I dust the cabinets inside and out, making sure no streaks or dust remains. I vacuum up the loose strings of thread that lie under the racks.

By 3.55pm, I'm closing the door, not to be locked until strictly 4pm, otherwise management has a fit because what if a millionaire wanted to spend all their money at 3.59pm? Yes, that is actually their reasoning.

When 4pm rolls around and the doors are locked, the cash is counted and coat hangers are one and a half inches apart. And when tomorrow rolls around it'll be the exact same way.

Are you a frontline retail staff member with a story to tell? Share it anonymously with us at editor@theregisrer.co.nz

This story originally appeared in NZ Retail magazine issue 750 June / July 2017

This is a community discussion forum. Comment is free but please respect our rules:

  1. Don’t be abusive or use sweary type words
  2. Don’t break the law: libel, slander and defamatory comments are forbidden
  3. Don’t resort to name-calling, mean-spiritedness, or slagging off
  4. Don’t pretend to be someone else.

If we find you doing these things, your comments will be edited without recourse and you may be asked to go away and reconsider your actions.
We respect the right to free speech and anonymous comments. Don’t abuse the privilege.

 
News

What’s in store for The Everything Store?

After years of persistent rumours, Amazon has confirmed its arrival in the Australian market. Is it coming to New Zealand next? If so, what should ...

 
 

New Nespresso retail concept takes aim at queues

  • Design
  • January 18, 2018
  • Sarah Dunn
New Nespresso retail concept takes aim at queues

Coffee-pod retailer Nespresso has opened a new concept store in the Auckland suburb of Albany which aims for an immersive shopping experience. The boutique, which opened in December 2017, boasts an experiential design and virtual queuing system.

Read more
 
 

Expert advice for Amazon's arrival

  • News
  • January 18, 2018
  • Sarah Dunn
Expert advice for Amazon's arrival

As part of a recent feature series on Amazon's Australian launch, our panel of retail experts - Massey University’s Professor Jonathan Elms; Sell Global’s Hamish Conway and Retail X’s Juanita Neville-Te Rito – each offered detailed advice on how retailers should adapt their offering to be more resilient against the Amazon effect.

Read more
 
topics
Amazon Arrival
Keeping up with all things Amazon as it ...
The Retail Yearbook 2017
As we battle our way through the busiest ...
The future is bright
We spoke with four retailers in their twenties ...
Hospitality enhancing retail
Some think food and integrated hospitality offerings will ...
Spotlight on signage
At first glance, the humble in-store sign might ...
Red Awards 2016
The Red Awards for retail interior design celebrate ...
Auckland Unitary Plan
Auckland is changing. The Unitary Plan will decide ...
Sisterhood
Women in retail help one another. We spoke ...
All things to all people
Kiwi retailers share their omnichannel strategies.
How to open a store
Sarah Dunn considers what it would take to ...
Rising stars
Retail's top young achievers.
Delivering on your promises
The sale isn't over until your item is ...
Retail in heartland New Zealand
Retailers keep the regions pumping, but how strong ...
The changing face of retail
Shifting demographics are creating big changes in New ...
The retail yearbook
With the help of experts in the retail ...
Retail rogues
We put the spotlight on staff training. Jai ...
Here come the giants
Topshop has arrived in Auckland’s CBD, David Jones ...
From retail to e-tail
Ecommerce has become part of the way mainstream ...
Loyalty in the digital age
How are retailers maintaining loyalty? Sarah Dunn, Elly ...
Window shopping: A spotlight on social media
Sarah Dunn and Elly Strang look at how ...
The Innovators | In partnership with Spark Business
Technology is rapidly changing the retail industry as ...
 
News

Tricks of the trade: Jon Macdonald

The Trade Me marketplace is easily New Zealand’s largest online retailer. Courtney Devereux talks to chief executive Jon Macdonald about the strong community that has ...

 
 
 

Andrea Moore is in liquidation

  • News
  • January 17, 2018
  • Sarah Dunn
Andrea Moore is in liquidation

Less than a year after a successful headline runway show at New Zealand Fashion Week, womenswear label Andrea Moore is in liquidation to the tune of $2.54 million.

Read more
 
Next page
Results for
Topics
Jobs
About us.

The Register provides essential industry news and intelligence, updated daily. And the digital newsletter delivers the latest news to your inbox twice a week — for free!

©2009–2015 Tangible Media. All rights reserved.
Use of this site constitutes acceptance of our Privacy policy.

Advertise
The Register

editor@theregister.co.nz

Content marketing/advertising? Email anita@tangiblemedia.co.nz or call 022 639 3004

View Media Kit

}