“The corporate model is dead”: Mahana Estates talks authenticity

  • News
  • December 6, 2016
  • Sarah Dunn
“The corporate model is dead”: Mahana Estates talks authenticity

“They’re small, they’re family-driven, family-focused, they understand the story,” Glover says.

Mahana Estates has flirted with a corporate model of distribution in the past, but Glover says it didn’t suit the wine company at all. He says the story behind Mahana’s product was viewed as “almost getting in the way” of selling the wine, and feels it was treated as something of a commodity.

Glover is confident that Kemp Wine Merchants will offer a different experience.

“Dan [Kemp] and his team really understand what we are trying to achieve at Mahana and we believe they will represent us very well in the New Zealand market. It seems to me that Dan’s focus is the people at the heart of wine drinking and wine making and that really resonates with me.”

Glover feels strongly that the future of premium products lies in artisan production models and integrity-led small businesses. Twenty years ago, he says, the top labels in the wine market were Penfolds Grange and other Australian corporate labels – while these wines were elite, the provenance of these blends was “somewhat suspect” and their production was not transparent.

“In wine, the opposite direction is this philosophy of terroir… where you’re buying the place.”

Terroir is a French winemaking term referring to the natural environment in which a wine is produced. Blended wines lose their terroir, says Glover, who feels blending creates wines which are heading towards being simply “a beverage”.

Glover feels it’s important for producers of artisan products such as his wine to be true to their creative vision, and trust that the market will understand. There’s a place for “commodity beverages”, he says, but New Zealand can do better – “We have to evolve”.

“To me, the corporate model is dead.”

Winemaking isn’t the only industry where an artisan approach rooted in a sense of place seems to be gaining popularity.

A number of new ecommerce ventures have sprung up to cater to consumer demand for SME-made independent products. Etsy-style marketplace The Market was launched in 2013 and went global in 2015, while New Plymouth operation Shop Small and Fairfax Media’s newest project Indexed both launched this year.

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The co-habitation of supermarket space

  • Opinion
  • June 28, 2017
  • Courtney Devereux
The co-habitation of supermarket space

Forbes has released a list of five ways in which supermarkets will change in three years. The article has put the spotlight on the importance of co-habitation for the survival of current supermarket models.

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EziBuy changes hands in Australia

  • News
  • June 28, 2017
  • Sarah Dunn
EziBuy changes hands in Australia

The Australia-based owner of EziBuy, Woolworths Group, has confirmed that the multi-channel clothing and homewares company has been acquired by Sydney investment firm Alceon Group for an undisclosed sum.

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Is the future of retail in jeopardy?

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  • June 28, 2017
  • Paul Keane
Is the future of retail in jeopardy?

The last few weeks in retail have seen a few ups and downs with Nosh taking a sudden turn for the worse, and new developments popping up across Auckland. RCG's Paul Keane surveys the changes.

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