Black jelly bean theory: Why are unpopular lollies still on shelves?

  • Checkout
  • January 19, 2017
  • Courtney Devereux
Black jelly bean theory: Why are unpopular lollies still on shelves?

There has been a great debate surrounding the least favorite flavours of popular foods, and a backlash against the small niche market their makers seem to be catering for.

A debate was sparked on the official Cadbury Dairy Milk Facebook page when the company asked its fans to like their post if they were a Cherry Ripe or Turkish delight supporter. Out of Cadburys’ 14.7 million followers, only six thousand liked the post.

One comment stated: “Cherry Ripe is offensive to both cherries and chocolate, both in the bin.” While another stated, “I’d eat a Moro bar I found in a carpark before I even looked at a Turkish delight.”

The same often goes for the dislike of black jelly beans and banana Starbursts. The unpopular flavors are always a topic of conversation while they sit untouched in the bag, awaiting that one particular person with altered (or non existent) taste buds.

Gherkins in McDonalds burgers were rumored to be there only as, in their absence, the burger would have such a high sugar content it would legally be classified as a dessert. This rumor has since been clarified by McDonalds representatives who said, “We add [gherkins] because they’re delicious.” Which also sounds like a rumor.

So why do these billion-dollar empires continue to stock these foods if people are so against them. Well, that can be answered with another question.

How many times have you not bought a Favorites box, or a bag of jelly beans just because there is a flavor you don’t like inside? Not often? The simple answer is because there is a market for these foods. In 2016 alone, Cadbury New Zealand made nearly $4,000,000 in revenue. The Wrigley Company, responsible for Starbursts, made just under $24,000,000 in 2016 worldwide.

Why should these manufacturers delete a line when the product is still selling? As long as there is a market for these items, they will be produced. And as long as they’re being produced, some people will buy them.   

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No changing these spots

  • Checkout
  • October 11, 2017
  • Sarah Dunn
No changing these spots

American womenswear retailer Kate Spade has collaborated with popular fashion blog Man Repeller to set up a two-day pop-up store selling only leopard-print items. It’s all there in the shop’s name: Leopard Leopard Leopard.

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